We are all part of the Human Rights Movement!

Breaking the Silence

What's Behind the Wave of Police, Security, and
Vigilante Killings of Black People?

Overview: What's Been Happening?

Be sure to read the excellent in-depth report "Operation Ghetto Storm" 
Written by Arlene Eisen, with preface by Kali Akuno, published by the Malcolm X Grassroots Committee.



From the war on drugs to the war on terror,
law enforcement's battle against minorities serves as pacification.


By Adam Hudson / AlterNet /

Police officers, security guards, or self-appointed vigilantes extrajudicially killed  at least 313  African-Americans in  2012 according to a recent study. This means a black person was killed by a security officer every 28 hours. The report notes that it's possible that the real number could be much higher.

The report, entitled "Operation Ghetto Storm", was [published] by the  Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, an antiracist grassroots activist organization. The organization has  chapters in Atlanta, Detroit, Fort Worth-Dallas, Jackson, New Orleans, New York City, Oakland, and Washington, D.C. It has a  history of organizing campaigns against police brutality and state repression in black and brown communities. Their study's sources included police and media reports along with other publicly available information. Last year, the organization published a similar  study showing that a black person is killed by security forces every 36 hours. However, this study did not tell the whole story, as it only looked at shootings from January to June 2012. Their latest study is an update of this. 

These killings come on top of other forms of oppression black people face. Mass incarceration of nonwhites is one of them. While African-Americans constitute 13.1% of the nation's population, they make up  nearly 40% of the prison population. Even though African-Americans use or sell drugs about the same rate as whites, they are 2.8 to 5.5 times more likely to be  arrested for drugs than whites. Black offenders also  receive longer sentences compared to whites. Most offenders are in prison for nonviolent drug offenses. 

Read More from Alternet Here

 

 


 

 


These resources compiled at the request of the Spirit House Project for a
National Teach-In, Worship Service, and Candlelight Vigil
held On April 22, 2014, in Washington, DC

Resources Table of Contents

We are all part of the Human Rights Movement

Dissent is Essential!

Global Human Rights
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